Rooftop Farming

The company Veggie Green House planned to start to build hydroponic greenhouses on rooftop of grocery stores and houses across the India, throughout 2018. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. Terrestrial plants may be grown with their roots in the mineral nutrient solution only or in an inert medium, such as perlite, gravel, mineral wool, or coconut husk. The Greenhouses harvest rainwater and produce food. Greenhouses typically offer the following sets of vegetables & fruits: lettuce and salad green varieties, leafy greens, herbs, tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers. They can potentially cultivate other vegetables & fruits. Because of the cultivation's proximity vegetables & fruits are very fresh and tasty since they don't get older and damaged during long transportation.

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The Key Benefits of a Rooftop Farming

A roof garden is any type of vegetation established on the roof of a building. Apart from the decorative benefit, roof garden serves the purpose of providing architectural enhancement, temperature control, recreational opportunities, habitats for wildlife and food. The method of cultivating food on the rooftop is referred to as rooftop farming.

  • Small well-tended plots of land can yield surprising amounts of produce. In a 130-day temperate growing season, a 10x10 meter plot can provide most of a household’s total yearly vegetable needs, including much of the household’s nutritional requirements for vitamins A, C, and B complex and iron.
  • In many parts of the world, urban food produce augments urban food supplies particularly, but not only, of fruits and vegetables.
  • Urban spaces that produce significant amounts of food include: parks, utility rights-of-way, bodies of water, roof tops, walls and fences, balconies, basements and courtyards.
  • Urban area food production can operate at a for-profit farm scale, producing high quality fresh foods (including protein-rich production) on relatively small amounts of space that include aquaculture, hydroponics, and greenhouses.
  • Urban area food production can operate at a for-profit farm scale, producing high quality fresh foods (including protein-rich production) on relatively small amounts of space that include aquaculture, hydroponics, and greenhouses.
  • Urban area food production can operate at a for-profit farm scale, producing high quality fresh foods (including protein-rich production) on relatively small amounts of space that include aquaculture, hydroponics, and greenhouses.
  1. It converts CO 2  emissions
  2. It produces oxygen
  3. It reduces the heat of buildings and energy costs
  4. It creates a habitat for wildlife
  5. It reduces ambient temperature
  6. It captures and harvests rainwater
  7. It reduces storm water runoff and discharge
  8. It creates large catchment areas.
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Health Benefit of a Rooftop Farming

Enhance the urban landscape (and human well-being). By cultivating lettuces, kale, arugula, and other crops, rooftop farms literally make cities greener. And studies have found that exposure to nature and vegetation provides an array of psychological benefits, from decreased anxiety to increased productivity.

Make cities more eco-friendly. Bare roofs in cities absorb and then radiate heat a phenomenon known as the “heat home effect.” This increases energy usage and contributes to the poor air quality that often plagues big cities. But rooftop farms help cool buildings, ultimately reducing carbon emissions. And by growing food in the communities they serve, rooftop farmers lessen the environmental impact of food transportation, as well.

Increase the availability of real, healthy food. When farmers grow inside or better yet, on top of the concrete jungles and food deserts that many of us inhabit, more people have access to fresh, wholesome, and affordable food. And because it travels fewer food miles, hyper-local produce is often healthier and tastier, too